Battle Strategy

At the height of the Ugandan government’s struggle with a terrorist rebel group, president Museveni turned to the church for help. Army chaplain David Wakalo had received a vision from God in which he was told that the war would not end through force of arms, but through prayer. Thus began Operation Gideon. A team of intercessors gathered for several weeks of prayer and fasting, which resulted in a systemic breakdown of the rebel group’s occult influence. The war which failed by force succeeded with prayer.

When Judah’s king Jehoshaphat received word that “A vast army from Edom [was] marching against [him] from beyond the Dead Sea,” (v 2), he “was terrified and begged the Lord for guidance. He also ordered everyone in Judah to begin fasting. So people from all the towns of Judah came to Jerusalem to seek the Lord’s help” (vv3-4). In response to the nation’s passionate plea for help, “the Spirit of the Lord came upon Jahaziel son of Zechariah, a Levite. He said, “This is what the Lord says: Do not be afraid! Don’t be discouraged by this mighty army, for the battle is not yours, but God’s. You will not even need to fight; stand still and watch the Lord’s victory, for the Lord is with you!” (vv14-17)

Taking God at His word, Jehoshaphat “appointed singers to walk ahead of the army [into battle], singing to the Lord and praising him for his holy splendor. At the very moment they began to sing and give praise, the Lord caused the armies of Ammon, Moab and Mount Seir to start fighting among themselves. Not a single one of the enemy escaped” (vv21-24).

Prayer might not seem like a viable war strategy, but it is the most effective of all, because the battle belongs to the Lord (1 Samuel 17:47). Turn your struggles over to God, and praise Him in faith for the victory.

MORE: Read 2 Chronicles 16:9 for insight into how God responds those who trust Him.

NEXT: Have you lost hope in the midst of a battle? Apply the war strategy of prayer and praise to see God move.

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